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PURUSHOTHAMA KAMATH

Alungal Farms

SOUTH ASIA - Cochin

This is not a wonderland with fairies and elves. But here, one can find lots and lots of singing birds, dancing squirrels and sweet smelling flowers. And the place becomes truly magical when we consider the fact that it exists in the heart of a city with busy roads and concrete structures. Our wonderland is called Alungal Farms but we would like to call it the Alungal Woods. A V Purushothama Kamath owns the woods. He is the master and the creator of a dense thicket of rare trees and plants.Sitting in the coolness of the verandah, Kamath unravels the tale of this success story. He says that they have been living in the typically traditional way with a passion for horticulture. Horticulture is in my blood. Both my father and grandfather were agriculturists. Some years back, I read about rare medicinal plants facing extinction and wanted to do my bit to save at least 10 varieties. That's how I got started.

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SPIRIT to discover
PURUSHOTHAMA KAMATH
STORY to share
ALUNGAL FARMS
STYLE to experience
HORTICULTURE WONDERLAND

PURUSHOTHAMA KAMATH

INDIA, KERALA, COCHIN

Wonderland - Alungal Farms

A quiet spot of lush greenery right in the heart of the city, enter into Alungal Farms. Owned by A.V. Purushothama Kamath, ‘Gurukul’ as the farm set in an area of one and a half acres is called, is home to more than 600 rare medicinal flora.

Photo: Sudhith Xavier

PURUSHOTHAMA KAMATH

INDIA, KERALA, COCHIN

Wonderland - Alungal Farms

The farm is the result of his vast hands-on experience and keen observation. He is very particular in finding out the details regarding the plants he has collected. This he does from books and partly from Botany professors. He has in his possession several ancient ‘granthas’ based on horticulture.

Photo: Sudhith Xavier

PURUSHOTHAMA KAMATH

INDIA, KERALA, COCHIN

Wonderland - Alungal Farms

Kamath has a rare seedless collection of jackfruit, mango, chaampa and lemon. There is the ‘valliplaavu’ which grows to a height of only around four feet, sometimes near the roots and bears very sweet jackfruit. All the work is done by Kamath himself. Family members lend him a helping hand.

Photo: Sudhith Xavier

STORY to share

ALUNGAL FARMS

Meet Purushothama Kamath, a horticulturist, who is on a mission to protect endangered herbs and trees, is part of AYURVEDA TRAILS and COCHIN TRAILS.

A quiet spot of lush greenery right in the heart of the city, enter into Alungal Farms. Owned by A.V. Purushothama Kamath, 'Gurukul' as the farm set in an area of one and a half acres is called, is home to more than 600 rare medicinal flora. There is a meditative calm about the century-old ancestral home of Kamath. A natural canopy, is formed by a huge mango tree laden with juicy Jahangir mangoes on which the 'Changalam Peranda', a rare old medicinal creeper intertwines with bright red berries. There are thick aerial roots and a Brazilian cherry tree with small cherries that resemble tiny, ripe tomatoes overlooks the verandah.

Sitting in the coolness of the verandah, Kamath unravels the tale of this success story. He says that they have been living in the typically traditional way with a passion for horticulture. Horticulture is in my blood. Both my father and grandfather were agriculturists. Some years back, I read about rare medicinal plants facing extinction and wanted to do my bit to save at least 10 varieties. That's how I got started.

The farm is the result of his vast hands-on experience and keen observation. He is very particular in finding out the details regarding the plants he has collected. This he does from books and partly from Botany professors. He has in his possession several ancient granthas based on horticulture.
There are lots of duplicates among these exotic plants. They are often mistaken for the original species. Pointing to a short tree with almond-shaped leaves growing in clusters, he says, This is really Malaveppe, but was thought to be Devadaru, which is usually not found in Kerala, but in the Himalayan region.  Kamath has a rare seedless collection of jackfruit, mango, chaampa and lemon. Then there is the valliplaavu which grows to a height of only around four feet, sometimes near the roots and bears very sweet jackfruit. All the work behind this venture is done by Kamath himself. Family members lend him a helping hand.

Text: THE HINDU, Parvathy Menon

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